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A repository for my pop culture thoughts, in addition to my work at TalkingwithTim.com
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Asker patbaer Asks:
Supernatural introduces women simply to kill them off and make the leads feel sad, and the show runners get a lot of (rightful) shit from their fanbase for it.
talkingwithtim talkingwithtim Said:

uncannybrettwhite:

Good fact to add to my arsenal.

RIP Polly Bergen (photo circa 1953) [Source: Corbis Images]

rodrigobaeza:

Jack Davis: Topps Nutty Awards card original art (1964)

(via jackdavisfoundation)

You American haters bore me to tears, Ms. Barham. I’ve dealt with Europeans all my life. I know all about us parvenus from the States who come over here and race around your old Cathedral towns with our cameras and Coca-cola bottles… Brawl in your pubs, paw at your women, and act like we own the world. We over-tip, we talk too loud, we think we can buy anything with a Hershey bar. I’ve had Germans and Italians tell me how politically ingenuous we are, and perhaps so. But we haven’t managed a Hitler or a Mussolini yet. I’ve had Frenchmen call me a savage because I only took half an hour for lunch. Hell, Ms. Barham, the only reason the French take two hours for lunch is because the service in their restaurants is lousy. The most tedious lot are you British. We crass Americans didn’t introduce war into your little island. This war, Ms. Barham to which we Americans are so insensitive, is the result of 2,000 years of European greed, barbarism, superstition, and stupidity. Don’t blame it on our Coca-cola bottles. Europe was a going brothel long before we came to town.
James Garner’s Charlie in The Americanization of Emily, in which screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky makes Aaron Sorkin’s ear for dialogue seem criminal.

Mitchell’s last piece for the magazine was the masterful “Joe Gould’s Secret,” which was published in 1964. Gould, a Village bohemian and self-proclaimed genius, was Mitchell’s most enigmatic subject: an “ancient, spectral figure;” “a banished man.” And yet, Mitchell identified with him more closely than one might have thought. Gould was a con artist, but, for Mitchell, the bohemian’s crumbling exterior was an irresistible invitation. The fact that Gould never produced his fabled “Oral History” was almost beside the point. In a 1992 interview about the two-part profile, Mitchell said that you “pick someone so close that, in fact, you are writing about yourself. Joe Gould had to leave home because he didn’t fit in, the same way I had to leave home because I didn’t fit in.”

Mitchell never wrote anything else for The New Yorker after that, and the mystery behind his literary silence has baffled many over the years. He would show up every day at the office, and colleagues often heard him typing away, but the next morning his desk would be clear. His mother and his dear friend Liebling both died in the mid-sixties, and then he lost his wife, Therese, in 1980, and this convergence of losses must have affected him deeply. He kept his office at the magazine for the next thirty-two years, until his death, in May of 1996.

A scribe of hidden lives, Mitchell let the streets speak to him. The city has changed, some of its sharper edges have smoothed over time, but there are still signs here and there of Mitchell’s New York. You just have to be willing to bend your ears and listen.

broadcastarchive-umd:

Baretta was a detective series which ran on ABC from 1975 to 1978. The show was a milder version of a 1973–74 ABC series, Toma, starring Tony Musante as chameleon-like, real-life New Jersey police officer David Toma. While popular, Toma received intense criticism at the time for its realistic and frequent depiction of police and criminal violence. When Musante left the series after a single season, the concept was retooled as Baretta, with Robert Blake in the title role.

This has to be the finest promo shot ever.

Alleged sexual assault now just casually listed between stolen soda and crab legs #reallyESPN?

oldshowbiz:

Three Stooges recording session, click to enlarge

oldshowbiz:

believe it or not, this is from 1929. it’s an ad for Fox 
"movietone" news.

Heh.

Super Sammy (Cindy Cheung) surprises her stage manager (Tara Flanagan) [Photo by Sanford Jenkins]

Above is an unused photo from my interview with greg-pak about his futurestatestv short film, Happy Fun Room.

oldshowbiz:

Educational Studios on Santa Monica Blvd was actually a conveyor belt of comedy two-reelers, featuring the likes of Imogene Coca on her way up and Buster Keaton on his way down.

openbookstore:

Marcel Marceau didn’t say much, but he did sign this book! #justdonated (at Open Books)

atlantahistorycenter:

image

Greek dancing group performing at Lenox Square. c. 1970

Browse and order prints from our collection.

nyprarchives:

Last month marked the 50th anniversary of the death of American Southern Gothic writer Flannery O’Connor. Despite dying at a young age (39), she greatly contributed to the work in this genre, and is still read extensively today. Ms. O’Connor lived briefly in the New York City area before moving to Iowa to attend the prestigious Writer’s Workshop.
Five years ago the Leonard Lopate Show interviewed Brad Gooch, a biographer of Ms. O’Connor. It’s an intimate and funny look at the life of a mysterious yet influential woman.
Open Culture also has a recording of Flannery O’Connor reading one of her most popular short stories “A Good Man is Hard to Find.”
(Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

nyprarchives:

Last month marked the 50th anniversary of the death of American Southern Gothic writer Flannery O’Connor. Despite dying at a young age (39), she greatly contributed to the work in this genre, and is still read extensively today. Ms. O’Connor lived briefly in the New York City area before moving to Iowa to attend the prestigious Writer’s Workshop.

Five years ago the Leonard Lopate Show interviewed Brad Gooch, a biographer of Ms. O’Connor. It’s an intimate and funny look at the life of a mysterious yet influential woman.

Open Culture also has a recording of Flannery O’Connor reading one of her most popular short stories “A Good Man is Hard to Find.”

(Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)